JOB 9
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11 Lo, he goeth by me, and I see him not: he passeth on also, but I perceive him not.

The earth is beautiful.‭ ‬It bears the marks of wise and good contrivance in every fibre‭; ‬yet the contriver is nowhere to be found. Job's experience is the experience of all:‭

‭'‬Behold, I go forward, but he is not there; and backward, but I cannot perceive him' 23:8

There is no explanation of the vexing problem but the one furnished by the Bible,‭ ‬and this,‭ ‬as a rule,‭ ‬is rejected by the wise of this world-poetisers and all other sorts.

‭ ‬Man alienated from the architect and builder of‭ "‬this house with starry dome and gemlike floor,‭" ‬cannot find Him by searching,‭ ‬and cannot‭ "‬feel at home‭" ‬where He hides Himself in displeasure.‭

‭"‬From room to room‭" ‬He will rove in vain,‭ ‬to find the trace of Him,‭ ‬unless he enter the little sanctuary of Judea,‭ ‬with its treasured records.‭ ‬Here he will find the‭ "‬Host‭" ‬has left a message,‭ ‬explaining that we are‭ "‬captives‭" ‬because of revolt,‭ ‬but that we may become‭ "‬guests‭" ‬by reconciliation through faith in His son,‭ ‬who laid down his life for us‭; ‬and that being thus‭ "‬justified by faith,‭ ‬we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ,‭" ‬who will be here in due course to resume possession and management of the star-domed house,‭ ‬in which the reconciled children will be wholly at ease and at home for ever in‭ "‬the presence of His glory with exceeding joy.‭"

‭The Christadelphian, March 1894. p114-115


12 Behold, he taketh away, who can hinder him? who will say unto him, What doest thou?

...And has the father embraced the Truth yet? Well, no; he is very friendly, but he cannot get over the prejudice against the divinity of the Bible which he has imbibed from various "learned" sources. The God of the Bible is too petty for him. He does not like the "narrow way" and the "few-there-be-that-find-it" doctrine. He wants a God who will be a God and a saviour to everybody.

This is a very kindly desire on his part. He might as well want a "nature" that will do no drowning and starving with draught and famine. There is no such God as he wants any more than there is such a nature as he would like. Yet you cannot persuade him to accept the God there is. It seems probable he will go to the grave gazing after a God that has no existence, rejecting "the only living and true God," because He is not what he, a creature, thinks He ought to be.

This is a kind of intellectual infatuation that it is very difficult for common sense to understand. It is the characteristic of wisdom by every standard to find FACTS AS THEY ARE, and accept them with the utmost docility. The man who dictates to facts is bound to be carried away by their irresistible force at last.

Bro Roberts - Second Voyage to Australia