JEREMIAH 31
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4 Again I will build thee, and thou shalt be built [rebuilt], O virgin of Israel [Betulat Yisroel]: thou shalt again be adorned [adorn thyself] with thy tabrets [ timbrels], and shalt go forth in the dances of them that make merry [the dance of merrymakers].

Jeremiah must have delivered the prophecy of chapter 31 with joy. It demonstrates that though Jewry would receive divine punishments as they deserved and for their good, the nation will ultimately be saved. The apostle Paul similarly argues in Rom. 11 - GEM

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10 Hear the word [Devar] of Yahweh, O ye nations [Goyim], and declare it in the isles afar off [preach it in the farthest shores], and say, He that scattered Israel [Yisroel ] will gather him [Yisroel ], and keep him [He shall be shomer over Yisroel], as a shepherd doth his flock [Ro'eh over the Eder thereof].

11 For Yahweh hath redeemed Jacob [Ya'akov], and ransomed [made Geulah] him from the hand [ yad ] of him that was stronger [ chazak] than he [Ya'akov].

...for the past few weeks we have been with the prophet Jeremiah in his trials and sufferings. His life was one of the loneliest and saddest in Scripture. His personal experiences were bitter. The message of disaster he had to proclaim was depressing and unwelcome. And the times in which he lived were of unparalleled national calamity. His efforts were foredoomed to failure. It was a lost cause from the beginning. He was everywhere hated and misunderstood. While intensely loving and grieving for his countrymen and his nation, he was despised and persecuted as an enemy and a traitor.

But amidst all this background of thick gloom, there shines in a few chapters in the center of the book the glorious picture of the eternal kingdom of righteousness that will finally triumph, and in which this rejected prophet will have an honored part.

"Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will raise up into David a righteous Branch, and a King shall reign and prosper, and shall execute judgment and justice in the earth. In his days Judah shall be saved, and Israel shall dwell safely" - chapter 23.

Chapter 31 - "He that scattered Israel will gather him, and keep him, as a shepherd doth his flock."

Jeremiah was born in the closing years of the long evil reign of Manasseh. This king's reign sealed the doom of the kingdom and brought to an end God's much-tried longsuffering and patience. Jeremiah records, in chapter 15, God speaking, "I will cause them to be removed into all kingdoms of the earth, because of Manasseh the son of Hezekiah king of Judah, for that which he did in Jerusalem...I am weary with repenting."

The evil Manasseh was born during the fifteen years that were added to Hezekiah's life, when he pleaded with God. Far better for Hezekiah and for Israel, if Hezekiah had submitted to God's wisdom and gone to his rest with his glorious record of faith unsullied, as God in His mercy had planned.

Jeremiah begins his ministry in the reign of the good king Josiah. It was a bright brief interlude of righteousness, but it did not last. Josiah began to reign when he was eight years old. When he was sixteen, he dedicated himself to serve God, and when he was twenty, he set about purging Judah from all their wickedness and idolatry. Jeremiah began his ministry in the next year-the thirteenth of Josiah's reign. Jeremiah would be about the same age as Josiah-about twenty.

It is truly a touching picture of these two young men-king and prophet-laboring to turn the nation to righteousness, as the smoldering judgments of God hovered over the land, just as two young men-a prophet and a king, John and Jesus-did in the days of the nation's final judgment.

It is notable that Jeremiah's ministry began just 40 years before the destruction of Jerusalem and the burning of the temple by the Babylonians. We remember that Jesus began his ministry just 40 years before the destruction of Jerusalem and the burning of the temple by the Romans. In each case a 40-year period of final probation was given to the city.

Jeremiah's mission was to witness for God against apostate and worldly Israel. The Jews today still jealously preserve and revere the prophecy of Jeremiah, though it contains their condemnation as a nation and the record of God pleading in vain with them to return and be saved.

Jeremiah's work was not only as a witness of condemnation. It had a far more glorious purpose. It was principally to encourage and strengthen the scattered faithful remnant of his own day and of all ages since. In this sad time of present crisis for the Truth, its message of comfort has great and sustaining power.

Bro Growcott - Prophet of Judgment and Glory


15 Thus saith Yahweh; A voice was heard in Ramah, lamentation, and bitter weeping; Rahel [Rachel] weeping for her children [banim] refused to be comforted for her children [banim], because they were not [no more].

Rachel is put for the town, or women inhabiting the town of Bethlehem, wherein was the sepulchre of the literal Rachel, of which, consequently, those inhabitants were still in possession.

Eureka 13.12.



16 Thus saith Yahweh; Refrain thy voice from weeping, and thine eyes from tears: for thy work shall be rewarded [sachar], saith Yahweh; and they shall come again from the land of the enemy [ return from the eretz oyev].

17 And there is hope [tikveh] in thine end [thine acharit (future, latter end)], saith Yahweh, that thy children [ banim ] shall come again [return] to their own border.

I have said, that this belligerent state of things between the King of Israel and the nations of Gogue's dominion, styled "the goats," will continue for forty years. The subjugation will be gradual as Israel is made to "go through" from kingdom to kingdom. "Feed thy people," saith the prophet, "with thy rod, the flock of thy heritage, which dwell solitarily in the wood; let them feed in Bashan and Gilead as in the days of old." In answer to this petition, the Lord replies,

"According to the days of thy coming out of the land of Egypt will I show unto him (Israel) marvellous things."

This is forty years; for so long were they in passing from Egypt to Canaan, which was the type of their coming out from among the nations to the holy land under the generalship of Elijah, the Lord's harbinger, to the Ten Tribes. The "marvellous things" to be shown them will not be performed in private, but will be as notorious as the plagues of Egypt; for

"the nations shall see and be confounded at all their might: they shall lay their hand upon their mouth, their ears shall be deaf. They shall lick the dust like a serpent, they shall move out of their holes like worms of the earth; they shall be afraid of the Lord the God of Israel, and shall fear because of thee" (Mic. 7:14-17).

The more immediate consequence of these exterminating wars will be the cessation of all further resistance in the north, which will have been thus compelled to "give up" the Israelites among them, and to let them go and serve in "the wilderness of the people." They will not march directly into the Holy Land, because the generation of Israelites who leave the north, will be no more fit for immediate settlement there than their fathers were who left Egypt under Moses. They would be as rebellious under the Government of Shiloh as that generation whose carcasses fell in the wilderness, and concerning whom "Yahweh sware in his wrath that they should not enter into his rest."

They must, therefore, be subjected to discipline, and trained up under the divine admonition. But, notwithstanding all the "marvellous things" they will have witnessed, they will prove themselves true to the character of their fathers, who were stiff-necked and perverse, and resistant always of the spirit of God; so that they will not be permitted to enter into the land of Israel. Their children, however, will come thither from "the land of the enemy," and attain to their own border (Jer. 31:15-17).

The reader will, doubtless, desire to know upon what ground I affirm these things. This is as it ought to be; for he should set his face like a flint, and refuse credence to any thing and every thing which is not sustained by "the testimony of God." Turn, then, to the prophet Ezekiel, where it is thus written,

"As I live, saith the Lord God, surely with a mighty hand, and with a stretched out arm, and with fury poured out, will I rule over you: and I will bring you out from the people, and will gather you out of the countries wherein ye are scattered with a mighty hand, and with a stretched out arm, and with fury poured out. And I will bring you into the wilderness of the people, and there will I plead with you face to face; like as I pleaded with your fathers in the wilderness of the land of Egypt, so will I plead with you, saith the Lord God. And I will cause you to pass under the rod; and will bring you into a delivering of the covenant: and I will purge out from among you the rebels, and them that transgress against me: I will bring them forth out of the country where they sojourn, and they shall not enter into the land of Israel: and ye shall know that I am the Lord" (Ezek. 20:33-38).

While they are in this wilderness it is, that the Lord Jesus becomes "a stone of stumbling and rock of offence to the house of Israel," as he had before been to Judah; and the consequence is, that "the rebels among them" are excluded flom the blessings of Shiloh's government, and eternal life and glory in the then world to come. Nothing can be plainer than Ezekiel's testimony.

If the reader know how the Lord pleaded with Israel face to face in the wilderness by the hand of Moses, he will well understand the ordeal that yet awaits the tribes to qualify them for admission into the Holy Land. The Lord's power and the angel were with them in the wilderness of Arabia, but they saw not his person; so, I judge, will the Lord Jesus and some of the saints be with Israel in their second Exodus, seen perhaps by their leaders, as the Elohim were by Moses, Aaron, the elders, and by Joshua; but not visible to the multitude of the people, who must walk by faith and not by sight; for, though God is able to graft them in again, he can only do it upon a principle of faith; for the condition of their restoration laid down in his word is, "if they abide not in unbelief they shall be grafted in again."

Elpis Israel 3.6.



18 I have surely heard [Ephrayim] bemoaning himself thus; Thou hast chastised me, and I was chastised, as a bullock unaccustomed to the yoke [ like an unbroken egel]: turn Thou me, and I shall be turned; for thou art Yahweh my Elohim.

While they are in this wilderness it is, that the Lord Jesus becomes "a stone of stumbling and rock of offence to the house of Israel," as he had before been to Judah; and the consequence is, that "the rebels among them" are excluded from the blessings of Shiloh's government, and eternal life and glory in the then world to come. Nothing can be plainer than Ezekiel's testimony.

If the reader know how the Lord pleaded with Israel face to face in the wilderness by the hand of Moses, he will well understand the ordeal that yet awaits the tribes to qualify them for admission into the Holy Land. The Lord's power and the angel were with them in the wilderness of Arabia, but they saw not his person; so, I judge, will the Lord Jesus and some of the saints be with Israel in their second Exodus, seen perhaps by their leaders, as the Elohim were by Moses, Aaron, the elders, and by Joshua; but not visible to the multitude of the people, who must walk by faith and not by sight; for, though God is able to graft them in again, he can only do it upon a principle of faith; for the condition of their restoration laid down in his word is, "if they abide not in unbelief they shall be grafted in again."

It would seem from the testimony of Malachi, who prophesied concerning the ten tribes, that while they are in the wilderness of the people they will be disciplined by the law of Moses as their national code, while things concerning Jesus will be propounded to them as matter of faith; for it is testified by Hosea that they shall be gathered, and "shall sorrow a little for the burden of the King of princes" (Hos. 8:10).

The person with whom they will have more immediately to do in their second exodus is Elijah. There would seem to be a fitness in this.

In the days of their fathers, when they forsook the Lord and abolished the law of Moses, Elijah was the person whose ministerial life was occupied in endeavouring to "restore all things." Though he did much to vindicate the name and law of Yahweh, he was taken away in the midst of his labours. For what purpose? That he might at a future period resume his work and perfect it by restoring all things among the ten tribes according to the law of Moses, preparatory to their being planted in their land under a new covenant to be made with them there (Mal. 4:4-6; Jer. 31:31).

Elpis Israel 3.6.



31 Behold [Hinei], the days come, saith Yahweh, that I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel [cut a Brit Chadasha with Bais Yisroel], and with the house of Judah [Bais Yehudah]:

32 Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers [Brit that I cut with their Avot] in the day that I took them by the hand [yad] to bring them out of the land of Egypt [Eretz Mitzrayim]; which My covenant they brake [My Brit they broke], although I was an Husband [Ba'al] unto them, saith Yahweh:


The first constitution of things under which the Jews existed as the Kingdom of God has been done away with, and will not be re-established. When they are restored, a New Covenant will be made with them...

The Good Confession



33 But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel [Brit that I will cut with Bais Yisroel]; After those days, saith Yahweh, I will put My law in their inward parts [Torah in them inwardly], and write it in their hearts [ketuvim on their hearts]; and [I] will be their Elohim, and they shall be my people.

Ketuvim - The third and final section of the Hebrew Bible: Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Songs, Lamentations, Ruth, Esther, Ecclesiastes, Daniel, Ezra, Esther.

There is poetry - of Temple ritual, private prayer, wisdom, national tragedy, even love. There is philosophical exploration-of the wisest path in life, of God's goodness and justice. There are historical retellings and short stories.

https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/ketuvim-writings/



34 And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour [ ish his re'a ], and every man [ ish] his brother, saying, Know Yahweh: for they shall all know Me [have da'as of Me], from the least [katon] of them unto the greatest [gadol] of them, saith Yahweh: for I will forgive their iniquity [avon], and I will remember their sin [chattat] no more.

When this is accomplished, they will be a truthful and righteous nation, and filled with the spirit as the apostles were of old. Thus anointed, they will be intelligent and wise, and the mightiest of the nations of the earth. The Hebrew nation has never attained to so high a position as this yet; nevertheless, it is the destiny that awaits their repentance, and acknowledgement of Jesus Anointed, as their Lord and King.

Eureka 3.2.8.