1 CORINTHIANS 5
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7 Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us:

The Sacrifice of Christ: substitutional punishment to appease Divine wrath? Or, dreadful, purposeless torture for a mere empty "ritual" and symbol?

OR -- the essential, ultimate self-perfecting of holiness and beauty and victory? -- the God-created, God-taught, God-strengthened Son "learning obedience through the things that he suffered"; and achieving -- in the fullness of faith and love -- the supreme perfection of manhood, that he may absorb all mankind into himself, and into his own perfect victory?

How marvelously brethren Thomas and Roberts have pointed out to us that it is this latter! Be humble, and be thankful. Those who cast aside an intelligent appreciation and respect for the work these brethren did under God's hand, soon lose the depth and beauty of the Truth.

Do not let them deceive you.

We cannot have peace with God if we are deliberately not having peace with man.

Bro Growcott



Christ our passover 

"For the love of Christ constraineth us", says Paul, "because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead: and that he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live into themselves, but unto him which died for them, and rose again" (2 Cor. 5 : 14-15).

He died for us, therefore we should live for him - that is the simple logic of our position. But we can only live for him by also feeding on him. He is our Passover lamb: as Israel had to eat the entire flesh and assimilate it fully into themselves, so must we eat him and make him part of Our very being (John 6 : 51-57)· And in measure as we do that, we shall realize the moral obligations of the Passover ritual in sinlessness of life, purging out the old leaven of our past life that we may be a new lump as, by status, we indeed are.

... As Christ was greater than the Temple because he was the embodiment of the moral concept for which it stood, so have we ourselves to be in fact (as well as in theory) "the temple of God" (1. Cor. 3 : 16). "For ye are the temple of God ; as God hath said", states Paul. And on what authority? On that of the Law, even though, as a Law, it has been abrogated.

"I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people" (2 Cor. 6 : 16): Such were God's words for Israel. But they are equally words for us, for we too, as Israel were, are "a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people". And we are this for the same great purpose as were Israel -"that we should show forth the praises of him who hath called us out of darkness into his marvellous light" (1 Peter 2 : 9).

The symbolism of the Law lays upon us the same moral obligations as it laid upon Israel, precisely because it realized itself so completely in him of whom we now form part.

"Therefore if any man be in Christ he is a new creature; old things are passed away'; behold all things are become new" (2 Cor. 5 : 17)·

Let us see to it that this is true of us, by giving ourselves wholly to God's service; loving Him with all our heart, and soul, and might; surrendering to Him the fat and strongest portion of our lives; living by every word that proceedeth out of His mouth; yielding ourselves to the influence of His Spirit; doing all things, however menial, as unto Him and solely to His glory.

Then, in His mercy, when that day comes when the earth shall be full of His glory, and when even upon the bells of the horses shall be "Holiness to the Lord", He will be pleased to dwell in us and admit us into perfect and eternal fellowship with Him and with His Son, Jesus Christ our Lord, our Saviour and our King.

"Now unto him that is able to keep us from falling, and to present us faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy, to the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and for ever. Amen."

Law and Grace Ch 13



Christ celebrated the passover with his disciples: in this he held up Moses and the firstborn to our view: for the passover had no meaning apart from the Lord passing over the blood-sprinkled houses of the Israelites in Egypt on the night that he went through the land and destroyed the firstborn in every house in Egypt.

Christ said the passover would be "fulfilled in the kingdom of God" (Luke 22:16) which implies the typical nature of the passover feast, in harmony with Paul's teaching that Christ is our passover, sacrificed for us (1 Cor. 5:7). Thus, Christ in the kingdom and Christ on the cross unite with Moses in Egypt on the night of the exodus--which may enable us to understand why the final song of salvation is "the song of Moses and of the Lamb" (Rev. 15:3).

Law of Moses Ch 21



8 Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.

The‭ ‬Christadelphian Ecclesia is engaged in the work of making ready a people prepared for the Lord,‭ ‬and having a glorious Hope based on great and precious promises,‭ ‬she will purify herself by‭ "‬purging out the old leaven of malice and wickedness,‭ ‬and keep the feast with unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.‭"

Her work is not a work of ignorance,‭ ‬idleness and indifference,‭ ‬which says‭ "‬Christ fellowshipped Judas,‭" "‬Let the tares and wheat grow together,‭" "‬Every one must give an account for himself,‭" "‬I have nothing to do with what another says or does,‭" "‬Let us have peace,‭" "‬You must not judge,‭" &‬c.

And‭ ‬this,‭ ‬the Ecclesia,‭ ‬or‭ ‬Body of Christ the pillar and ground of the Truth,‭ ‬and the Temple of God in which His Spirit dwells‭!!

‭The Christadelphian, April 1887



Christ celebrated the passover with his disciples: in this he held up Moses and the firstborn to our view: for the passover had no meaning apart from the Lord passing over the blood-sprinkled houses of the Israelites in Egypt on the night that he went through the land and destroyed the firstborn in every house in Egypt.

Christ said the passover would be "fulfilled in the kingdom of God" (Luke 22:16) which implies the typical nature of the passover feast, in harmony with Paul's teaching that Christ is our passover, sacrificed for us (1 Cor. 5:7). Thus, Christ in the kingdom and Christ on the cross unite with Moses in Egypt on the night of the exodus--which may enable us to understand why the final song of salvation is "the song of Moses and of the Lamb" (Rev. 15:3).

Law of Moses Ch 24



11 But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat.

He offers us an opportunity to work and live and commune with Him throughout eternity. All He wants is our full appreciation and wholehearted acceptance of the offer. He simply asks us to choose between Him and the world upon every occasion when the choice is before us, not as a matter of self-denial but of enlightened love and true preference.

The fundamental requirement is that we must want to serve Him, whenever and however we can. We must desire Him above all things through a fully developed recognition of His infinite desirability. We all desire many things. Why? In many cases we could not give the reasons. We say they are natural desires. We desire things because we think, or feel that they are desirable; that they will satisfy certain longings within us.

God has assured us that in Him all desires find their ultimate and permanent fulfillment. The purpose of life and the Scriptures is to bring a full realization and conviction of that fact to the minds of those whom God has loved and chosen.

There were many serious offenses among the Corinthians, things difficult to conceive of among brethren; but these very searching letters were written while the ecclesias were in the earliest formative stages. It had not been long since they had first heard the glorious news Paul brought and had come in out of the dark Gentile night. They had so many things to learn to make them spiritually-minded and acceptable children of God.

We marvel at the tremendous labour Paul undertook to form holy ecclesias of God out of the shapeless clay of Gentile ignorance and corruption. We get occasional glimpses of the material from which he drew. "Such were some of you," he says, after cataloguing the deepest vices, "but ye are washed, sanctified and justified, in the name of the Lord Jesus." Firmly and patiently he corrects them and molds them together into the body of Christ, always holding before them the highest ideals of holiness and perfection.

Bro Growcott - Self examination



13 But them that are without God judgeth. Therefore put away from among yourselves that wicked person.

Answers to Correspondents 1 Cor. v. 13.‭ ("‬Them that are without,‭ ‬God judgeth.‭")

This,‭ ‬which you quote,‭ ‬is in the present tense‭; ‬hence,‭ ‬the point of the argument is that we are not called upon to decide on the doings of those outside the household,‭ ‬but are called upon to judge inside,‭ ‬to the point of putting away from among ourselves a wicked person.‭ ‬Judgment in this passage has reference not to a future judgment-for Christ alone will judge His household-but to a present course of action towards our brothers and sisters.‭ ‬As to those outside and how they should be treated if they do wickedly,‭ ‬it does not concern us.‭ ‬That is for God,‭ ‬the Judge of all the earth,‭ ‬to decide.‭ ‬Therefore,‭ ‬I consider this passage does not prove the resurrection to judgment of those outside.‭"

Answer.‭-‬There is no exception to be taken to these excellent remarks in the main.‭ ‬They clearly elucidate the bearing of Paul's discrimination between those‭ "‬within‭" ‬and those‭ "‬without‭" ‬in the matter of ecclesial judgment.‭ ‬An ecclesia is responsible for wickedness within,‭ ‬but not for wickedness without.‭ ‬True and good‭; ‬but the question at issue is,‭ ‬Does God ignore the wickedness‭ "‬without‭?" ‬Does He judge or not judge‭ "‬them that are without‭?" ‬The passage answers this directly in the affirmative.‭

The only question not directly touched on by the passage is,‭ ‬When‭? ‬The tense of the verb settles nothing,‭ ‬for it is indefinite-past,‭ ‬present,‭ ‬or future.‭ ‬But it is not indefinite in‭ Rom iii. 6‬.‭ "‬How‭ ‬shall God judge the world‭?" ‬This is future.‭ ‬And then there is the great body of Bible teaching already adduced that God has appointed a day for judgment,‭ ‬and does not judge the wicked now,‭ ‬except in the providential and national sense in which He judges Israel now,‭ ‬a sense which does not‭ (‬as all admit in the case of Israel‭) ‬exclude the judgment waiting at the appearing of Christ.‭

It was the doctrine of Eliphaz and his companions that God judges the wicked now‭ (Job iv. 7-9 ; viii. 6-13 ; xv. 20, 24)‬.‭ ‬It was the doctrine of Job that God did not judge the wicked now,‭ ‬but gave the earth into their hands,‭ ‬in safety and power,‭ ‬and reserved them to the day of wrath as‭ "‬those that rebel against the light‭" (Job xxiv. 13; ix. 24; xxi. 7, 15, 26, 30)‬.‭ ‬God condemned the doctrine of Eliphaz,‭ ‬and endorsed the doctrine of Job‭ (xlii. 7)‬.‭ ‬This is conclusive of the question of‭ ‬when‭ "‬God judgeth those that are without.‭"

‭The Christadelphian, July 1894. p274